Birther idiocy, and election of birther judge, helps Obama. When will GOP figure this out?

A tweet I sent out earlier today lamenting that birther¬†Gary Kreep had pulled ahead in a close race for Superior Court judge here in San Diego prompted two emails ripping me for not being happy to see a “true conservative” win a judgeship. Groan. I’m a libertarian lite, not a conservative. And I remain absolutely stupefied that birthers and people who tolerate birthers don’t realize that Barack Obama and his fans love this idiocy being repeated because it discredits all critics of the president. I’m completely convinced that Obama has intentionally not acted in decisive ways to end this moronic “debate” because he knows it helps him. Duh. Duh. Duh.

To recycle what I wrote a half year ago, the idea that Obama wasn’t born in the U.S. is so painfully stupid I barely know where to start. Here’s one obvious way to refute it: His parents’ presence at the University of Hawaii was well-documented. Arriving in 1959, his father was celebrated as the university’s first African-born student. His mom’s arrival the next year is also documented. So what did Obama’s poor graduate student mom purportedly do? Fly to Kenya or Indonesia in the summer of 1961, with or without Barack Sr., so she could have their kid in Third World conditions instead of First World Oahu? People really believe this? Really? Sheesh.

In an interview with Kreep this spring, I brought this up. He asked why his birther views were relevant. I pointed out he wanted to be a judge, and asked what did believing stuff like this say about his judgment. He offered an earnest, intense defense of his views. Oh. My. God.

It’s incredible/depressing/amazing that after all these years, I keep encountering people who either repeat the birther baloney or raise other myths, like the idea Obama Jr. never really went to Columbia University. This is so bleeping tiresome, and wrong.

I wish the people who focus on this stuff — even if they really and truly believe it — would just shut up. At least if they really and truly don’t want Obama to be re-elected.¬†His record is so godawful, starting with the horror that is Obamacare and the wasted $800 billion in stimulus spending, that it is immensely counterproductive to bring up the birther stuff or the other urban myths.

Why?

1. It takes away from far more powerful arguments against Obama’s re-election — far more powerful because they are true and about real issues.

2. But mostly because the birther narrative gives credibility — oh, yes, it does — to the argument that the disdain for Obama is because of who he is, not what he’s done as president. This is a toxic perfume the GOP should shun.

It’s inevitable that a president with as exotic a background as Obama’s would raise doubts that previous presidents didn’t. But at some point, these doubts appear to reflect the “fear of the other” — especially when they’re unsubstantiated — and “fear of the other” is easily depicted as, yes, racist.

The 20 percent or whatever it is of adults who are birthers might read that last sentence and recoil — “That’s unfair!” “That’s not right!” “Slander!”

Sorry, chumps, go back and read my first graph. The 1959 arrival of Barack Obama Sr. was not just a footnote at the University of Hawaii — it was an event! The first African student! Anyone who understands this to be true and who is also a birther who believes the president’s mom left Oahu to have her kid thousands of miles away in scary hospitals for no apparent reason — well, you draw your own conclusions, but I suspect the people who believe this have either had lobotomies or should strongly consider them.

Still believe the birther dung? Please keep it to yourself. Unless, that is, you want your least favorite “noncitizen” to be elected president for a second time.

Sheesh.

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