Flashreport, Greenhut warnings on Fletcher vindicated 10-fold

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Even before he quit the Republican Party in March, San Diego Assemblyman Nathan Fletcher had come into the cross hairs of influential Flashreport publisher Jon Fleischman and Steven Greenhut, the Sacramento-based libertarian think tanker, editor and pundit with a national following. Now, as an independent mayoral candidate in today’s elections in San Diego, Fletcher has lived up to their warnings. He’s essentially teamed up with public employee unions against San Diego’s leading critic of the government status quo, rival mayoral candidate Carl DeMaio. I provide the grisly details here at Cal Watchdog.

Life imitating ‘Primary Colors’: Did Hillary keep stunning drug dirt on Obama under wraps?

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I think the drug war is crazy and that marijuana should be legalized. But as a student of U.S. politics, I’m flabbergasted by the implications of the fact that it didn’t come out until now that Barack Obama was such a gung-ho young pothead that he thanked his drug dealer in his high school yearbook. Obama barely beat Hillary Clinton. If he had to spend months in 2007-08 dealing with stories that his high school buddies all depicted him as a smarter, more exotic version of Cheech and Chong, I don’t think he would have won.

Calbuzz boys, Skelton analyze state woes — never mention unions! LOL!

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The idea that unions are a bad influence on California is hardly just a conclusion of folks on the right. In 2005, the Los Angeles Times endorsed Prop. 75, saying barring the automatic deduction of union dues from public employees’ pay would lead to a fairer balance of power at the local and state government level. The Sacramento Bee editorial page has gone after unions for being unreasonable for years; here’s a recent example. Unions are so out of control that it barely raises eyebrows when union officials and allies like state Dem Party leader John Burton advocate a policy that would prevent giving anti-convulsion drugs to kids at risk of death if the person doing the giving isn’t a union nurse. But guess who completely absolves unions? The Calbuzz boys, whose writing style/shtick builds off the idea that they’re smarter than everybody, and the L.A. Times’ George Skelton, dean of Sacramento journos. Really, guys? Not a single mention of unions in your recent dissections of California’s dysfunction? Not one? Wow.

Whose idea was it to push bullet trains? Rahm Emanuel’s doctor brother. I feel ill.

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“The Escape Artists,” the new book about the Obama administration’s economic policy-making, has an amazing story about who’s responsible for the decision to dump tens of billions of dollars in federal stimulus money into bullet-train debacles. One Chris Reed, writing at Cal Watchdog, has all the details.

The key passage from “Escape Artists” is here:

Arnold’s self-loving ode: It’s revealing what he omits — and what he includes

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After Assemblyman Nathan Fletcher got national attention for self-righteously quitting the GOP to pursue the San Diego mayor’s seat as an independent, it was inevitable that Arnold Schwarzenegger would write an L.A. Times op-ed patting himself on the back for being a constructive non-Neanderthal maverick Republican. Years before he was fine-tuning the constructive maverick narrative for Fletcher, political guru Matt David was doing it for John McCain,  Arnold and Jon Huntsman. But the problem for Schwarzenegger is what he leaves out of his op-ed — his assault on the Sacramento establishment from 2003-2005 — and what he leaves in — implied championing of three of the left’s biggest boondoggles: Obamacare, green jobs and the bullet train. If I were Fletcher, I’m not sure I’d want to be linked to Arnold.

Groan: Jerry says GOPers who share public opposition to higher taxes are ‘cultists’

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From 2001-2009, many people on the left and more than a few on the right and in libertarian circles warmed to the argument that one reason George W. Bush was such a disappointing president was because he lived in a bubble, surrounded by yes men. When is the rest of California going to figure out that almost all of Sacramento is in a bubble? Exit polls after the May 19, 2009, special election showed Dems, Republicans and independents alike hated the higher taxes pushed by the Sacramento media-political establishment. Yet inside the Sacramento bubble, the columnist for the most influential newspaper writes that it is “hard to find anyone” who doesn’t think tax hikes should now be shoved down voters’ throats. And the governor whose own tax hike power play would callously put schools at risk unless income and sales taxes are increased by a November ballot measure goes on national TV to suggest that only Republican “cult” members are opposed. Yo, George Skelton! Yo, Jerry Brown! Who says the public is on your side?

Odds cap-and-trade fees will be spent prudently: 1 quadrillion to 1

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The Legislative Analyst’s Office is required to pretend as if Sacramento is not a place where public policy debates usually revolve around the question of how to best disguise the fact that just about everything state government does is dedicated to protecting the interests of public employees. That’s why I got such a kick out of the LAO’s earnest exhortation Thursday that the up to $14 billion a year that will be forthcoming from AB 32 cap-and-trade fees be spent in a thoughtful manner. Are you kidding me, LAO? This is California! That is not an option!

Is California cap-and-trade dead? What it looks like to someone paying close attention

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Like 99.9 percent of the California media, I’m not keeping all that good tabs on the implementation of AB 32′s cap-and-trade system under which companies will buy and sell their pollution rights as part of the state’s forced shift to cleaner but costlier energy. I may have written about it Sunday partly to make fun of Jerry, but that doesn’t mean I’m an expert. So what does California’s implementation look like to someone who understands the issues? It looks stalled — maybe permanently. This is from the respected SoberLook.com economics web site:

Jerry said WHAT about high-speed rail? It’s time to revive the Gov. Moonbeam label

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Three months ago, Jerry Brown was winning praise from state journos for naming savvy people to the board of the California High-Speed Rail Authority who were much more honest about the numbers and the project in general, especially this guy. This had Sacramento speculating he was setting the stage for the bullet train’s demise, as this new honesty produced a jaw-dropping new $98 billion cost estimate for a statewide system that didn’t even reach San Diego or Sacramento. Now Jerry is mocking the cost estimate as too high and saying the proceeds from cap-and-trade will help pay for the bullet train. Has Jerry been smoking PCP? Is this a first sign that we’re about to witness our governor’s ugly public descent into senescence? One way or the other, this much it’s obvious: It’s time to revive Gov. Moonbeam as a nickname. Unless this is some sort of freaky iPhone 5 Zen triangulation, Jerry appears to have lost his mind.